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Electrical Energy and Power: All You Need to Know

Electrical Energy

There is a lot of confusion when it comes to converting energy and power to electrical energy. That is because electrical power and energy are slightly different from what we commonly understand in our daily life.

All the Information You Need

The electrical energy is obtained from the electric potential difference between the two, P = I/R, where V is your potential difference, and I is the conductivity. We already know that the strength of an electric current is always inversely proportional to the wire resistance. This means that the harder the wire is to conduct, the weaker the electrical current.

It is then important to define the units of measurement for the electrical energy transfer, such as amperes or kilo amps. Then we need to convert this to watts, and finally, we need to convert this into milliamps. Thus, we get the level of electrical energy transfer that we desire.

Electrical Energy

As we have established, we want to convert the energy and power into electrical energy per unit of time. Therefore, we must measure the amount of time needed for the process to occur. We can use resistors and capacitors to do this.
Many individuals mistakenly believe that the power industry is primarily interested in generating fossil fuel that can be used for the generation of electricity. However, the primary objective of the power industry is to generate clean-burning renewable energy that can ultimately reduce the dependence on fossil fuels.

Solar and Wind Energy

Although solar energy and wind energy are often used in electricity generation, these types of sources have much greater variability and are very expensive to generate. Although wind and solar power technology have advanced greatly, many factors, such as surface roughness, turbulence and shading, can significantly decrease the efficiency with which they operate. As a result, the cost of producing these types of energy is still very high relative to other alternatives.

Electrical Energy

Renewable Forms of Energy

The second point to note that is that some forms of energy, such as biomass, oil and natural gas, are renewable forms of energy that are widely used. Their use, like the use of coal or petroleum, provides a sustainable source of energy.
The question becomes, when will these sources become insufficient to provide the electrical energy needed by our society? At the current growth rate of fossil fuel production, the Earth’s non-renewable resources will likely run out in our lifetime. This fact also leads us to another important question; what would happen if we dramatically decreased the growth rate of these non-renewable resources?

The third point relates to the level of pollution that is associated with the production of electrical energy. The combustion of fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide and other pollutants, which are potentially harmful to the environment.

In addition, the exhaust from the combustion of fuel also produces heat, which is potentially damaging to the structures in which the fuel burns. The overall impact of increased combustion energy output and waste heat is a potential difference between the amount of electrical energy produced and the amount of waste created.
While increased levels of energy production may theoretically reduce the amount of waste, it is likely that the increased cost of electricity generated through increased usage of energy could lead to an increase in the creation of waste.

Electrical Energy

Thermal Energy

Another potential difference between electrical energy and power produced through thermal energy is that of potential energy. In a thermal power generation system, heat is used to create mechanical power, such as through the rotation of a turbine or an alternator.

Unlike electricity, which is composed primarily of a chemical charge, mechanical energy is composed mainly of an electro-mechanical charge. A purely electrical system cannot provide any source of potential energy. In a thermal power generation system, however, heat is used as a source of potential energy, which may be converted into electrical energy through the use of a transfer device.

Motive Power

One final potential energy difference between electrical and thermal is that of motive power, which is defined as the force that propels an object with no internal force acting on it. Mass, momentum, and velocity are the three forces that provide this force.

Electrical Energy

In terms of an object’s motion, it is a measure of the time it takes for it to move from point A to point B without undergoing any friction. If there is no such source of potential energy, then the speed at which it moves must be determined by something external, such as gravity or microwaves. This can be a highly complex concept, but it can be simplified using the law of conservation of Energy.

Basically, conservation of energy requires that an object conserves every bit of its own heat or potential energy. It also requires that it never loses any of its momentum. The conversion of one form of electric energy to another is known as transformation. There are two types of thermodynamics: kinetic energy and potential energy, and both depend solely on the transfer of energy.